I once had a friend staying with me, and she was worried about a small decision my daughter made. She later told me how stressful the visit was, because of that one thing.

Let me explain a bit more (while still respecting the privacy of both my friend and my daughter).

The one thing.

My daughter’s behaviour didn’t harm anyone.

It didn’t inconvenience anyone.

It was not made or carried out in anyone’s presence.

It didn’t impact on my friend’s ability to do anything.

It didn’t create any consequences my friend had to live with.

I was 100% unconcerned with the decision my daughter had made. It didn’t inconvenience or worry me. It was completely fine by me.

So when my friend later told me how stressful it was for her, and how it impacted on her ability to enjoy staying with us, I was blown away!

It wasn’t hers.

She didn’t own it. She CHOSE to be concerned. She CHOSE to be worried about the decision my daughter made. I was incredibly surprised that my friend didn’t have the self-awareness to realise she was feeling stressed about something that she simply didn’t own.

How do I deal?

One of my go-to responses to stress is to write a list – itemise the things on my mind (which is where stress lives, of course).

And then I categorise:

  1. what’s mine?
  2. what’s not mine?

I look at the what’s not mine category and often that’s all I need to do – acknowledge I’m carrying stress about things that aren’t mine and that I can’t influence.

That simple awareness (and the fact I’ve written it down and acknowledged it) is usually all it takes for me to let something go.

I basically roll my eyes at myself and go, well duh, that’s not mine. I cross it off the list and it’s gone.

I know.  Sometimes it’s not that easy!

If it’s not that easy to do, then I think about what meaning I’m attributing to that thing that’s not mine, and see what I can shift there.

Sometimes it’s just a shift I need to make in my thinking. Other times I might need to act so that I can cope with the things that are not mine, but that are impacting on me nevertheless.

Then I look at the what’s mine category and plan out what I can do about it and when, and what I need so I can action that.

Voila.

Stress management 101 (according to Shelly).

You’re welcome!